Blurb:

In 1997 Andrew Marshall’s partner, and the only person to whom he had ever truly opened his heart, died after a gruelling and debilitating illness. Unmoored from his old life, and feeling let down by his family, Marshall struggled not only to make sense of his loss but to even imagine what a future without Thom might look like. In his diary, he wrote about what set him back – like a rebound relationship – some weird and wonderful encounters with psychics and gurus and how his job as a journalist gave him the chance to talk about death with a range of famous people, a forensic

In his diary, he wrote about what set him back – like a rebound relationship – some weird and wonderful encounters with psychics and gurus and how his job as a journalist gave him the chance to talk about death with a range of famous people, a forensic anthologist, and a holocaust survivor.

Slowly but surely with the help of friends, a badly behaved dog and a renewed relationship with his parents, he began to piece his life back together. Although his diary was never meant for publication, Marshall did share it with friends and colleagues dealing with bereavement, who found it immensely helpful, so to mark the twentieth anniversary of Thom’s death, he has decided to open it for everybody to read. My Mourning Year is a frank and unflinching account of one man’s life for a year after the death of his lover. In turn heartbreaking, frustrating and even sweetly funny, this is no step-by-step guide to dealing with bereavement but a shoulder to lean on when facing the unknowns of death, and a resource for those left behind.

My Mourning Year is a frank and unflinching account of one man’s life for a year after the death of his lover. In turn heartbreaking, frustrating and even sweetly funny, this is no step-by-step guide to dealing with bereavement but a shoulder to lean on when facing the unknowns of death, and a resource for those left behind.

My Mourning Year Book Cover My Mourning Year
Andrew Marshall
Non-Fiction
RedDoor Publishing
2017-04
pdf, Paperback
282
Publisher

This book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

This book is hard to review because I honestly couldn't finish reading it, not because it was bad, but because while reading it, I was reminded of how fragile life is, and how we cope when we lose someone close to us.

Grief and the loss of a loved one is a very heavy subject that movies and other media soften to seem less intimidating- something sad that we'll eventually get over this book didn't sugarcoat that, with made it simultaneously painful and beautiful to read.

As I mentioned earlier, I did not finish reading the book, so my review would be base don the parts that I read. For a full review, I recommend:

  1. Rebecca Foster's Goodreads Review
  2. Nicola Smith's Goodreads Review

Marshall met Thom, the headmaster of a German language school, on a holiday to Spain in September 1989.
They communicated via letters and calls, as well as flew between Germany and England regularly for years, and in 1995 Thom finally relocated to join Marshall near Brighton.

Thom had plans to start an interior design business but fell sick just six months later. He was later diagnosed with liver failure and was given weeks to live. They traveled to Germany to get Thom a second opinion.

It was sad watching the slow changes in their interacting, watching Thom's body change and watching as Marshall struggle to keep it together, I was relieved when he got angry at the car rental when he got a manual car instead of automatic like he requested. I felt he needed to pour his frustrations out,

I felt he needed to pour his frustrations out, admittedly the poor lady did not deserve to be the one he took his frustrations out on. Thom's interaction with his father had me trying to read between the lines, but then again that was the way they communicated and while I wish his father was more expressive people are who they are.

I liked Andrews's interaction with Thom's brother, it felt somewhat awkward sometimes, but at the same time, it made me pretend to forget about the fact that Thom was dying. - I know that's kinda sad.

This is just the first half of the book, the second part was about Andrew slowing letting himself grief and heal. That was the part I couldn't read because it was so damned painful, I felt like I was there watching Andrew yet powerless to do anything.

andrew-marshallAbout the Author, Andrew Marshall has written seventeen self-help books – as Andrew G. Marshall – including the international best-seller I love you but I’m not in love with you. His work has been translated into twenty different languages and he still writes for the Mail on Sunday, Daily Mail, and Daily Telegraph. This is the first time he’s written about himself.

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